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dc.contributor.authorHadj-Ahmed, Mohamed Aminefr
dc.contributor.authorSamson, Nathaliefr
dc.contributor.authorPraud, Jean-Paulfr
dc.contributor.otherBeck, Jenniferfr
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-11T17:30:31Z
dc.date.available2015-10-11T17:30:31Z
dc.date.created2012fr
dc.date.issued2015-10-11
dc.identifierPMID:22518828fr
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11143/7945
dc.description.abstractIt has been demonstrated that a progressive increase in nasal pressure support ventilation (nPSV) leads to an active inspiratory glottal closure in non-sedated newborn lambs, which limits lung ventilation (24, 33). Unlike nPSV, the pressure delivered during nasal Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (nNAVA) is synchronized to the diaphragm electrical activity on inspiration (36). Given the tight neural integration of the glottal dilators and constrictors with diaphragm activity on inspiration and expiration respectively, the aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that inspiratory glottal closure does not develop during nNAVA. Polysomnographic recordings were performed in eight non-sedated, chronically instrumented lambs, which were ventilated with progressively increasing levels of nPSV and nNAVA, in random order. States of alertness, diaphragm and glottal muscle electrical activity, tracheal pressure, SpO2, tracheal PETCO2 and respiratory inductive plethysmography were continuously recorded. While phasic inspiratory glottal constrictor electrical activity appeared with increasing levels of nPSV in 5 out of 8 lambs, it was never observed at any nNAVA level in any lamb, even at maximal achievable nNAVA levels. In addition, a decrease in arterial PCO2 was neither necessary nor sufficient for the development of phasic inspiratory glottal constrictor activity. In conclusion, nNAVA does not induce active glottal closure in non-sedated newborn lambs at high-pressure levels, in contrast to nPSV.fr
dc.language.isoengfr
dc.relation.isformatofdoi:10.1152/japplphysiol.01496.2011fr
dc.relation.ispartofISSN:8750-7587fr
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of applied physiologyfr
dc.subjectNasal intermittent positive pressure ventilationfr
dc.subjectDiaphragm electrical activityfr
dc.subjectPressure support ventilationfr
dc.subjectThyroarytenoid musclefr
dc.subjectGlottisfr
dc.subjectQuiet sleepfr
dc.titleAbsence of inspiratory laryngeal constrictor muscle activity during nasal neurally adjusted ventilatory assist in newborn lambsfr
dc.typeArticlefr
dc.rights.holder© American Physiological Societyfr
udes.description.typestatusPost-publicationfr
udes.description.typepubRévisé et accepté par des pairsfr
udes.description.pages1-35fr
udes.description.period113(1)fr
udes.description.sponsorshipCanadian Institutes of Health Researchfr
udes.description.sponsorshipCanada Research Chair in Neonatal Respiratory Physiologyfr
udes.description.sponsorshipFoundation of Starsfr
udes.description.diffusionDiffusé par Savoirs UdeS, le dépôt institutionnel de l'Université de Sherbrookefr
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationHadj-Ahmed, M. A., Samson, N., Bussières, M., Beck, J., Praud, J.-P. (2012). Absence of inspiratory laryngeal constrictor muscle activity during nasal neurally adjusted ventilatory assist in newborn lambs. Journal of applied physiology, 113(1), 63-70. doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.01496.2011fr
udes.description.sourceJournal of applied physiologyfr
udes.autorisation.depottruefr
udes.description.ordreauteursHadj-Ahmed, Mohamed Amine; Samson, Nathalie; Beck, Jennifer; Praud, Jean-Paul


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