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Other titre : Modelling the impact of compliance with dietary recommendations on cancer and cardiovascular disease mortality in Canada

dc.contributor.authorBélanger, Mathieufr
dc.contributor.otherPoirier, Martinefr
dc.contributor.otherJbilou, Jalilafr
dc.contributor.otherScarborough, Peterfr
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-27T19:48:55Z
dc.date.available2017-09-27T19:48:55Z
dc.date.created2014fr
dc.date.issued2017-09-27
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11143/11279
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Objectives: Despite strong evidence indicating that unbalanced diets relate to chronic diseases and mortality, most adults do not comply with dietary recommendations. To help determine which recommendations could yield the most benefits, we estimated the number of deaths attributable to cardiovascular diseases and cancer that could be delayed or averted in Canada if adults changed their diet to adhere to recommendations. Study Design: Macrosimulation based on national population-based survey and vital statistics data. Methods: We used a macrosimulation model to draw age- and sex-specific changes in relative risks based on the results of meta-analyses of relationship between food components and risk of cardiovascular disease and diet-related cancers. Inputs in the model included Canadian recommendations (fruit and vegetable, fiber, salt, and total-, monounsaturated-, polyunsaturated-, saturated-, and trans-fats), average dietary intake (from 35 107 participants with 24-h recall), and mortality from specific causes (from Canadian Vital Statistics). Monte Carlo analyses were used to compute 95% credible intervals (CI). Results: Our estimates suggest that 30 540 deaths (95% CI: 24 953, 34 989) per year could be averted or delayed if Canadians adhered to their dietary recommendations. By itself, the recommendation for fruit and vegetable intake could save as many as 72% (55-87%) of these deaths. It is followed by recommendations for fibers (29%, 13-43%) and salt (10%, 9-12%). Conclusions: A considerable number of lives could be saved if Canadians adhered to the national dietary intake recommendations. Given the scarce resources available to promote guideline adhesion, priority should be given to recommendations for fruit and vegetable intake.fr
dc.language.isoengfr
dc.relation.isformatofhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2013.11.003fr
dc.relation.ispartofISSN:1476-5616fr
dc.relation.ispartofPublic Healthfr
dc.rightsAttribution - Pas d’Utilisation Commerciale - Pas de Modification 2.5 Canada*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/ca/*
dc.subjectNutritional requirementsfr
dc.subjectMortalityfr
dc.subjectChronic diseasefr
dc.subjectStatisticsfr
dc.titleModeling the impact of compliance with dietary recommendations on cancer and cardiovascular disease mortality in Canadafr
dc.title.alternativeModelling the impact of compliance with dietary recommendations on cancer and cardiovascular disease mortality in Canadafr
dc.typeArticlefr
udes.description.typestatusPost-publicationfr
udes.description.typepubRévisé et accepté par des pairsfr
udes.description.pages222-230fr
udes.description.period128(3)fr
udes.description.diffusionDiffusé par Savoirs UdeS, le dépôt institutionnel de l'Université de Sherbrookefr
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationBélanger, M., Poirier, M., Jbilou, J., et Scarborough, P. (sous presse). (2014). Modelling the impact of compliance with dietary recommendations on cancer and cardiovascular disease mortality in Canada. Public Health, 128(3), 222-230. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2013.11.003fr
udes.description.sourcePublic Healthfr
udes.autorisation.depottruefr
udes.description.ordreauteursBélanger, Mathieu; Poirier, Martine; Jbilou, Jalila; Scarborough, Peterfr


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Attribution - Pas d’Utilisation Commerciale - Pas de Modification 2.5 Canada
Except where otherwise noted, this document's license is described as Attribution - Pas d’Utilisation Commerciale - Pas de Modification 2.5 Canada