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dc.contributor.authorLéonard, Guillaumefr
dc.contributor.editorCentre interdisciplinaire de recherche en réadaptation et intégration socialefr
dc.contributor.editorUniversité de Sherbrooke. École de réadaptationfr
dc.contributor.editorUniversité du Québec à Chicoutimi. Département des sciences de la santéfr
dc.contributor.otherMercier, Catherinefr
dc.contributor.otherTremblay, Louis E.fr
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-23T19:55:48Z
dc.date.available2017-02-23T19:55:48Z
dc.date.created2013fr
dc.date.issued2017-02-23
dc.identifierPMID:23228660fr
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11143/10140
dc.description.abstractDespite the extensive work published on the effects of electrical stimulation on corticomotor excitability, very few studies have focused on lower limb muscles. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of high-frequency afferent electrical stimulation of the anterior thigh area on the corticomotor excitability of lower limb muscles. Twenty-two healthy subjects (mean age 23 ± 7 yrs) participated in the study. Electrical stimulation was applied for 60 minutes on the anterior thigh area (frequency 100 Hz, pulse duration 60 µs, intensity below motor threshold). Motor evoked potentials (MEP) of the rectus femoris and biceps femoris muscles were recorded before, and after the electrical stimulation paradigm with a Magstim 200 stimulator. Analyses revealed a significant modulation in MEP amplitude for the RF but not for the BF muscle. Specifically, there was a significant reduction in MEP amplitude for the RF muscle immediately, 15 minutes and 30 minutes after the end of electrical stimulation when compared with baseline. The present results indicate that a 60-minute high-frequency electrical stimulation protocol applied on the anterior thigh area decreases the corticomotor excitability of the RF muscle. Although the exact duration remains unknown, the pattern of modulation observed indicates that the inhibitory effect lasts for more than 30 minutes after the end of stimulation, giving enough time for clinicians to work on the desired motor task during rehabilitation.fr
dc.language.isoengfr
dc.relation.isformatofdoi:10.1016/j.jocn.2012.02.049fr
dc.relation.ispartofISSN:0967-5868fr
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of clinical neurosciencefr
dc.rightsAttribution - Pas d’Utilisation Commerciale - Pas de Modification 2.5 Canada*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/ca/*
dc.subjectTranscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)fr
dc.subjectTranscranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)fr
dc.subjectMotor evoked potential (MEP)fr
dc.subjectRehabilitationfr
dc.titleRepetitive afferent electrical stimulation of the lower-limb : effect on corticomotor excitability and implications for rehabilitationfr
dc.typeArticlefr
udes.description.typestatusPost-publicationfr
udes.description.typepubRévisé et accepté par des pairsfr
udes.description.pages1-17fr
udes.description.period20(3)fr
udes.description.sponsorshipIRSCfr
udes.description.diffusionDiffusé par Savoirs UdeS, le dépôt institutionnel de l'Université de Sherbrookefr
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationLéonard, G., Mercier, C., Tremblay, L.E. (2013). Effect of repetitive afferent electrical stimulation of the lower limb on corticomotor excitability and implications for rehabilitation. Journal of clinical neuroscience, 20(3), 435-439. doi:10.1016/j.jocn.2012.02.049fr
udes.description.sourceJournal of clinical neurosciencefr
udes.autorisation.depottruefr
udes.description.ordreauteursLéonard, Guillaume; Mercier, Catherine; Tremblay, Louis E.fr


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Attribution - Pas d’Utilisation Commerciale - Pas de Modification 2.5 Canada
Except where otherwise noted, this document's license is described as Attribution - Pas d’Utilisation Commerciale - Pas de Modification 2.5 Canada